Aggressive Driving

Aggressive driving has become a serious problem on our roadways. It is often caused by frustration, impatience and irritability. Drivers in this state of mind sometimes speed, follow other vehicles too closely, change lanes frequently or abruptly without signaling, pass on the shoulder or other unpaved areas next to the roadway, and in general drive recklessly or Aggressive driving can refer to any display of aggression by a driver. It is often used to describe more extreme acts of physical assault that result from disagreements between drivers.

This increase in incidents has resulted also in an increase in the number of people killed and injured by aggressive drivers is scary and there are more vehicles on the roads. Yet the number of miles of roadway has increased by only 1%. Also, people are busier. Time is at a premium, and road congestion causes frustration.

The exact number of motor vehicle crashes caused by aggressive drivers is unknown, and hostile manner without regard to the safety of others. They sometimes harass other motorists which can result in altercations on the roadway a dangerous situation.

Most behaviors associated with aggressive driving are illegal. They don’t believe there will be consequences to their actions.

Characteristics of aggressive drivers:

Express frustration. Drivers climb into the anonymity of an automobile and take out their frustrations on anybody at any time. Their emotions are high, and the concern for fellow motorists is low.

Speed. Going faster than the posted speed limit, being a “road racer,” going too fast for conditions, and weaving in and out of traffic are some examples of speeding.

Lack attention to driving. Distractions from driving are a major cause of roadway crashes. Motorists are often seen eating, drinking, primping – yes, even shaving – as they drive. Some drivers make their automobiles a “home away from home,” with fax machines and laptop computers.

Rubberneck. Slowing down to look at an incident is a natural human reaction. But this behavior slows traffic, causes congestion, and may lead to another car crash.

Run red lights. Disregarding traffic controls is a leading cause of urban crashes.

driving lessons

driving lessons

DON’T BE AN AGGRESSIVE DRIVER

  • Change your schedule so you do not have to drive during rush hours.
  • If you’re running late, call ahead. Then relax.
  • Don’t drive when you are angry, upset or overly tired.
  • Get comfortable. Enjoy listening to music and avoid anything that might make you feel anxious.
  • Practice good posture. Sit back In your seat, loosen your grip on the steering wheel and don’t clench your teeth.
  • And remember, you never know what state of mind the drivers around you are in. Give others the benefit of the doubt; be polite, courteous, and forgiving.

HOW TO AVOID AGGRESSIVE DRIVING

Don’t offend

Avoid to cut other drivers, and always give them room to merge into your lane. If you’re in the left lane and somebody wants to pass, move over and let him by. Allow at least a two-second gap between your car and the one ahead. Keep your hands on the wheel and avoid to make any gestures that might anger another driver.

Don’t engage

Give angry drivers lots of room. Avoid eye contact with them. If you believe they’re trying to start a fight, get help call the police on your cellular phone or drive to a place with other people around. Try to get out of the vicinity of the aggressive driver.

Adjust your attitude

Forget winning don’t race the clock to get some place. Put yourself in the other driver’s shoes and don’t take erratic driving lessons behavior personally the other driver may be a volunteer fireman or physician responding to a call for help. If you think you have a problem, look for anger-management courses in your area.

Please follow and like us: